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". . . and that type of bravery will take you places." -Evan Sanders

My biggest pet peeve. No, no and NO! I have absoultely nothing against people who move abroad to teach English. However, I have put in the time (5.5 years) studying education and have two educational certifications. To teach English internationally, you do not need a teaching degree. I am a first grade teacher who teaches in English.

If I had a dime for every time someone asked me this questions, I'd never have to work again. To put it simply, I've already lived in Spain and it was time to go to another Spanish-speaking country. Chile is one of the most stable and safest countries in Latin America.

So you're an English Teacher?

My biggest pet peeve. No, no and NO! I have absoultely nothing against people who move abroad to teach English. However, I have put in the time (5.5 years) studying education and have two educational certifications. To teach English internationally, you do not need a teaching degree. I am a first grade teacher who teaches in English.

How long will you be in Chile?

Honestly, I don't know. My teaching contract is indefinite, meaning I can stay as long as I please. My goal is to become fluent in Spanish which will take some time. 

I find experiencing new cultures absoultey fascinating. I love teaching non-native English speakers and I love the diverse geography Chile has to offer. I will never get sick of the mountains in the distance.

Why don't you want to teach in the U.s.?

It's not that I don't want to, it's more like I'd rather be abroad at this point in my life. I love living abroad, where even the mundane is exciting and out-of-the-ordinary for me. I love living and experiencing different cultures. Being young and essentially not "tied-down" to anything or anyone is what allows me to have these unique experiences. Who knows how long I'll want to teach abroad, maybe for now, maybe forever. For now, I'm just seeing where life takes me.

So you're an English Teacher?

My biggest pet peeve. No, no and NO! I have absolutely nothing against people who move abroad to teach English. However, I have put in the time (5.5 years) studying education and have two education certifications. To teach English internationally, you do not need a teaching degree. I am a teacher who teaches all subjects in English, which does require a teaching degree. 

How do you find teaching jobs abroad?

Google. I sent my resume and information out to every American/ British school listed. I did not hear from any schools for months. I don't recommend going through a program because they give you an "allowance" rather than a salary, which is next to nothing. Be persistent and patient and eventually it will work out.

What advice do you have for someone who wants to teach abroad?

In terms of finding a job, I don't recommend going through an agency or program. There are application fees and the salaries are unreasonable. Instead, research where exactly you want to go and then search for the International Schools in that area and contact them directly.

One of my biggest suggestions would be to get hired from abroad. Generally, international contracts are much better than national hire contracts. Most schools will pay for your flight, visa, a portion of your housing and give you money to settle in.

The job search can be daunting. It may take months for a school to contact you back. Most schools won't even answer your initial e-mail. 

Some good websites to help you with your job search are: SearchAssociates.com and InternationalSchoolsReview.com

Both sites require a membership but I do think they're helpful.

**The above suggestions are directed for certified teachers. If you're looking to go abroad and teach English but you're not a certified teacher, I'd suggest finding an agency or company in the desired country.

 

Chile
why Chile?

If I had a dime for every time someone asked me this question, I'd never have to work again. To put it simply, I've already lived in Spain and it was time for this adventurer to go to another Spanish-speaking country. Chile is one of the most stable and safest countries in Latin America.

Why did you leave Chile?

This is a complicated question. To put it simply, after 3.5 years there, I felt like I had gotten everything out of the experience that I possibly could. As each school year came and went, everything started to repeat itself year after year. I grappled with the decision of leaving for over a year. It became very clear to me towards the end that it was time for a new adventure.

 

Although I loved my job, co-workers and friends, I knew from the start that I didn't want to live in Chile forever. Chile was one of the best decisions I've ever made, and I've grown so much because of it. I have absolutely zero regret about it.

 

What was your school/students like in Chile?

Santiago College is a very prestigious American private school. They are a Pre-K -12th grade school and they teach entirely in English. The students are primarily Chilean. They are among the top 3 best schools in the country. Pre-K- 2nd are taught in co-teaching settings, meaning there are two classroom teachers. I absolutely loved co-teaching. In first grade, they have six classes of about 28 students each.

 

The public education system in Chile is very poor. Anyone that can afford to get a private education does so. Private Schooling is very expensive, especially at Santiago College. Families pay small fortunes (about a college state tuition) on private schooling because the public system is so bad.

 

What was the best part about living in Chile?

I find experiencing new cultures absolutely fascinating. I loved teaching non-native English speakers and I loved the diverse geography Chile has to offer. I never got sick of the mountains in the distance.

What was the Worst part about living in Chile?

I really struggled in relating to the locals. The people there are a bit closed off so I had difficulty getting to know people and making friends. Chileans are generally very reserved and it's hard to break into their tight-knit social circles.

 

Customer service in Chile is basically non-existent. You'll often encounter rude and unhelpful people in the service industry. It was definitely a challenge for me coming from The U.S. where customer service is a big part of our culture. I learned overtime to develop a thick-skin and to not take it personally.

Did you feel safe in Chile?

Yes, I never felt like I was in danger in Chile (except during earthquakes). Most people see that Chile is in South America and assume that it is dangerous like some of its neighboring countries. Of course I wouldn't recommend walking downtown late at night alone or leaving your purse unzipped on the metro. But overall, it is a safe and stable country.